PORT KEMBLA’S MIGHTY STACK TO TUMBLE

The skyline of the southern NSW coastal town of Port Kembla will be forever changed when the iconic 198 metre Copper Smelter Stack is brought down by explosives. The State Government Planning Department has given final permission to remove the landmark, disused since 2003 but still a lingering reminder of the town’s industrial foundations, and visible from miles around and out to sea. For almost 50 years the stack has towered over the working class cottages of this city that hugs the rocky shelves of the Pacific Ocean, and is considered by many to be an icon of the area.

Certainly it is the most distinctive man-made object of the area, and one of the tallest chimney stacks in Australia. Whether it can be seen as beautifying or not, that is irrelevant in terms of heritage. Just because we may not think an object is attractive to the eye doesn’t mean its heritage value is not justified. On the contrary, heritage comes in many shapes and forms and the main point of reference is how it reminds us of how we once lived, worked, and grew as a nation. This constitutes true heritage, especially that of industrial heritage, where new techniques and ways of doing things are constantly evolving, thereby making redundant the old ways at regular intervals.

Steam locomotives, for example, are redundant as an effective means of transport, does that mean we should scrap all steam trains and not allow future generations the opportunity to lay their hands and eyes on them as we have had ourselves in the past? Many would argue that to see a fully working steam locomotive in the flesh is far more impressive than today’s electric equivalent. And there could be no arguement that this smelting stack in Port Kembla is similarly impressive.

The Hammerhead Crane at Garden Island is a recent example of redundant technology, and the sad decision made by the Federal Government to scrap this crane is a reminder of how out of tune we are with our industrial heritage, and how far we stand behind the rest of the world with regard to our dire lack of respect for heritage retention. With decisions like this being made time and time again here in Australia in the 21st century, we as a nation will be the poorer. When we erase these visible symbols of our industrial heritage, we erase the links to our past. The people who worked these things slowly disappear, their knowledge and workmanship disappears, and then the structures are taken away, we are left with very little to remember what once was commonplace.

Image flickr

Dominating the sleepy seaside townscape. Image flickr.

An aerial view of the Port Kembla smoke stack.

An aerial view of the Port Kembla smoke stack. Image Illawarra Mercury.

What the powers-that-be are saying to us, by allowing demolition of our heritage items en masse, is that our heritage is not important. They are saying to us “we don’t need these reminders, we only want to look to the future, to growth, to prosperity, nothing else matters…” and that “it’s not important for our children to see these things, there is no relevance of these things anymore, they do not belong here and they add no value to these places…” I am one who disagrees with this philosophy whole-heartedly. I believe there is a place for these things, I believe they represent who we are, and where we have come from, and to lose them means we are losing an innate part of who we are, of our own identity, and we shouldn’t be allowing short-term financial decisions alone to govern how we treat these objects of our inheritance.

The copper smelter stack at Port Kembla represents Port Kembla… It is Port Kembla. Just as the Hammerhead Crane is Garden Island. When we strip these historic industrial places of their relevant monuments we are taking away something symbolic, and leaving behind a more generic display. Many people in Port Kembla and around the Wollongong area won’t feel a need to commiserate or even commemorate the loss of such an object. They may even be glad to see the end of it. But whether they like it or not Port Kembla is an industrial working town, a lively hub of coal and steel that has helped shape Australia’s eastern seaboard growth. And so the smelter, this towering concrete and brick edifice, deserves its place watching over the landscape, it deserves its rightful position as a centrepiece of heritage standing sentinel over the tapestry of south coast industrial workings it helped create.

A local lobby group known as Stack 360 would agree with me. They have the foresight to see that this industrial vestige can be much more than just a blight on the town as some believe. They have demonstrated what can be accomplished by lighting up the stack with sound and light displays, attracting the attention of locals and visitors alike, and turning the structure from an overdue relic into a tourist drawcard virtually overnight. With visions to go further and create viewing platforms atop the monumental tower (imagine the view), it seems that yesterday’s dirty industry can indeed be turned into tomorrow’s tourist industry as it has in many other countries around the world.

Stack360 light show.

Stack360 light show. Image Lightsounds.

Kathy McCarthy photographed atop the stack on a rare employee viewing day. Image Illawarra Mercury.

Kathy McCarthy photographed atop the stack on a rare employee viewing day in 1987. Image Illawarra Mercury.

Unfortunately they may not get the chance. The site’s Japanese owners have declared they will not be saving the structure, which they claim suffers from concrete cancer, and demolition day had been set for 5 September. Port Kembla Copper had tossed up alternative techniques to demolish the stack after alarm was raised over the safe removal of asbestos within the expansion gaskets throughout the tower, and slower piece by piece removal was seen as a safer option to explosives. However explosive detonation was put firmly back on the agenda this year when a breakthrough occurred which could allow separate and safe removal of the expansion gaskets. Even now at this late stage, safety is of major concern for the Department of Planning & Infrastructure, the EPA, WorkCover and Wollongong City Council, who have stepped in to postpone the date of 5 September until all safety requirements can duly be met. “No demolition will occur until the Government is satisfied the work is safe, the methods are appropriate and all relevant concerns and issues have been fully addressed,” a joint statement said.

So for Port Kembla’s historic smelting stack, and industrial icon, the end, though not defined, is clearly near… Soon, maybe in September 2013, the stack will be felled and fall into a massive pile of rubble. Soon after that, the people who wanted it gone will have to find something else to talk about that they want gone. And soon again, after that, a meaningless business development will rise form its ashes. And then, when visitors ask the question, “what is there to see in Port Kembla?” where once we could have proudly replied “there’s a pretty impressive giant copper stack, one of the biggest in the country” now we will only be able to scratch our heads and throw up excuses. And not long after, this giant chimney will start to fade from our memories and we will even start to forget that it ever existed… Such is the way of the world.

Main image Pic by Andy Zakeli, illawarra Mercury.

An Interesting story from 2008 showing how things started to go wrong.

‘GREAT BIG SMOKING CHIMNEY STACK’
– An ode to such things, from my book Envelope Windows.

Facebook group Save the Stack.

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5 responses to “PORT KEMBLA’S MIGHTY STACK TO TUMBLE”

  1. inheritanceorg says :

    The stack was brought down today, Thursday 20th February 2014, along with half a century of Illawarra industrial history. An irreplaceable landmark has been lost, and the visible heritage of the area laid to waste… Could it have been saved? Of course.

    • Disgusted says :

      Hello, What was the point? Apparently the stack was structually sound. What was the cost of the demolition?.A totally stupid and unnecessary loss…

      • inheritanceorg says :

        I agree. Of course the stack was sound. It was a symbol of what is possible in this country and an icon of the area. Old chimneys and industrial vestiges are being kept all around the world as visible links to our heritage. Not here…

      • inheritanceorg says :

        The only reason I can think of is that they (Port Kembla Copper) wanted it gone while they have a blank piece of land alongside it. This would make it cheaper to bring down as they didn’t have to worry about where it fell. Later once this land is developed it would be harder to do, if they wanted to… So they are just clearing the way now under the cheapest possible circumstances. Aside from that there was absolutely no reason… it could have stood indefinitely and been repurposed for any number of uses, including tourism. Once again they took the cheapest option with no regard for heritage. The same thing is happening with the Hammerhead Crane in Sydney. Shame.

  2. Lindy says :

    Well you’ve will be haunted for the rest of their life’s…for bringing her down..she was a Grand Old Girl who stood high and tall looking out towards the sea,. Guiding all the ships into dock. I could see her on the train as I left Wollongong to head to Sydney for a day trip and I always look forward to seeing her again on my way back to Wollongong out the train window. As an Aboriginal Elder you have no idea what you’ve done and especially on that land. She was safe and sound and would never ever get in the way. Hope you’ve happy ” now ” for she will haunt you’ve with her spirit of noise that surrounds her. The day she came down she made such a haunting noise that I will never forget. The cry for help as she holds onto the ground …go and visit her at nite and see what happens to you’ve. Shame on you’ve.

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